• Does English use a lot of double speak like Spanish does?

    Or am i imagining things?
    Or am i imagining things?
    10 answers · 12 hours ago
  • Is learning Dutch useless?

    29 answers · 4 days ago
  • Do Europeans tend to be good at each others' languages?

    I'm thinking French people speaking Spanish, Germans speaking Italian etc etc.
    I'm thinking French people speaking Spanish, Germans speaking Italian etc etc.
    12 answers · 3 days ago
  • Is this sentence correct "What if God was one of us"?

    Best answer: In the song, you're right that it's wrong. It should say, "What if God were one of us?" That's because the rest of the song is in the present tense and because the frequent use of the conditional mood afterwards isn't ever placed in the past. It would only be correct if talking about... show more
    Best answer: In the song, you're right that it's wrong. It should say, "What if God were one of us?" That's because the rest of the song is in the present tense and because the frequent use of the conditional mood afterwards isn't ever placed in the past.

    It would only be correct if talking about the past, i.e., the past tense version of the question "What if God is one of us?" But if positing a hypothetical, or "irrealis," that has no timeframe because it isn't real, meaning it hasn't happened, isn't happening, and will probably never happen, then it should be "were" because it calls for the verb to be conjugated using the subjective mood. Particularly on that last point, if it's something that you wish to express will probably never be, then that's when you use an irrealis rather than the present tense, which you use when you want to toss those doubts aside, even if only for the sake of argument or hyperbole, like using the question to affirmatively suggest that God actually is one of us.

    Examples:

    * What if God were one of us here right now?

    * What if God was one of us at the movies yesterday?

    Lyrics:

    If God had a name, what would it be?
    And would you call it to His face?

    And yeah, yeah God is great
    Yeah, yeah, God is good
    Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah

    Since the first verse above says "would you call it to his face" instead of "would you have called it to his face, we know that "had" expresses the subjunctive mood rather than the past tense. Then in the second verse above, because she uses "is" instead of "was," she makes it abundantly clear that she's not talking about before but rather right now. That makes it reasonable to conclude that the "was" in the following verse should be "were" as it is expressing an irrealis:

    What if God was one of us
    Just a slob like one of us
    Just a stranger on the bus
    Trying to make His way home?

    The reason this mistake happens so often is the conjugations for the subjective mood and for the preterit tense are identical for every verb in the English language except one: "be." "Be" is the only verb where some of the conjugations of the subjunctive mood are not identical to the preterit tense, specifically those for the first person and first person plural.

    be - preterit tense
    I was
    you were
    he, she, it was
    we were
    you all were
    they were

    be - subjunctive mood
    I were
    you were
    he, she, it were
    we were
    you all were
    they were

    When you actually do want to express an irrealis that, while remaining out of time because it never happened, is nonetheless couched within a context of past events, then the pluperfect subjunctive mood is used, for example:

    * If God had been one of us, who would he have been?
    6 answers · 3 days ago
  • Native English speakers: Does "in the student numeral order" make sense?

    As this is a Japanese thing, I'm not sure this expression makes sense but in Japanese primary, middle, and high school, teachers often tell the students to answer questions one by one based on the order of the student number. How can this idea be expressed in English? Does this make sense? Students are told... show more
    As this is a Japanese thing, I'm not sure this expression makes sense but in Japanese primary, middle, and high school, teachers often tell the students to answer questions one by one based on the order of the student number. How can this idea be expressed in English? Does this make sense? Students are told to answer questions in the student numeral order. Would you give me a better way of expressing this idea? Thank you. I'd appreciate your feedback.
    9 answers · 2 days ago
  • What is the actual general definition of "riding the currents of time"?

    Yes I've consulted Google for an answer but it has failed me. I want to know if it refers solely to riding through the ages of time, from era to era. Or, can you use it less literally? Could it be used to refer to everyday existence? For example, if a person lacks a typical professional aspiration/ambition... show more
    Yes I've consulted Google for an answer but it has failed me. I want to know if it refers solely to riding through the ages of time, from era to era. Or, can you use it less literally? Could it be used to refer to everyday existence? For example, if a person lacks a typical professional aspiration/ambition and simply cannot see themselves tied down to a specific industry or company for the rest of their lives and simply wishes to experience what life and the world has to offer instead, can they accurately claim to "ride the currents of time, jumping from experience to experience, in search of a life to remember"? Basically, is claiming to be "riding the currents of time" accurate?
    7 answers · 1 day ago
  • How do you say hi in english?

    8 answers · 2 days ago
  • Can you say instead of "none of these" WAS antifungal?

    Best answer: The subject is "none of these" - basically a singular subject because of "none", thus it should be: "none of these was antifungal".

    In practice, you will find many native speakers of English writing "none of these were antifungal".
    Best answer: The subject is "none of these" - basically a singular subject because of "none", thus it should be: "none of these was antifungal".

    In practice, you will find many native speakers of English writing "none of these were antifungal".
    8 answers · 6 days ago
  • Native speakers of English: What is pointy finger? Is it the same as index finger?

    Best answer: Yes, a childish term for it.
    Best answer: Yes, a childish term for it.
    12 answers · 4 days ago
  • Did oath by yahoo or did yahoo buy oath when logging into yahoo answers something from Oath Privacy policy comes up?

    Best answer: Verizon joined Yahoo and AOL together to create Oath
    Best answer: Verizon joined Yahoo and AOL together to create Oath
    5 answers · 11 hours ago
  • What does this phrase mean in English?

    Best answer: Nothing. it makes no sense. There is no punctuation. Even if there was, it would still be gibberish. Please come back when you learn how to form a proper sentence.
    Best answer: Nothing. it makes no sense. There is no punctuation. Even if there was, it would still be gibberish. Please come back when you learn how to form a proper sentence.
    11 answers · 4 days ago