• Is the writer of this text an English native speaker?

    My English teacher asked us to pick a random text (such as comments on newspapers, posts on forums, etc.) and to decide whether the writer of the text is English native speaker, and to give reasons to our decision. I'm picking a part of a random text from Y!A. What do you think, is the writer native? And why?... show more
    My English teacher asked us to pick a random text (such as comments on newspapers, posts on forums, etc.) and to decide whether the writer of the text is English native speaker, and to give reasons to our decision. I'm picking a part of a random text from Y!A. What do you think, is the writer native? And why? Does s/he sound educated/ mature enough (disregarding the content, but rather from the language - is it a high school language, for instance)? I'm hesitating because the English seems a bit unusual (I'm not a native either so I don't really have the feeling). Here it is: --- "It's harder for me to endure the inhospitable attitude of French people, because I previously lived in Germany, and Germans treat foreigners from non-EU countries with respect and friendliness. I still remember my first weeks in Frankfurt vividly, and the number of times I was unable to find my way, holding the city map in my hands, when a German would approach and ask whether I would need his or her assistance. In France, let alone offering help, they avoid me like the plague each time I ask for directions. And I speak French (no less fluent than German). It's just one, most trivial example. French staffs' attitude at the Foreigners' Office is sarcastic at best - a far cry from their counterparts in Germany. I don't condone the animosity displayed by the minority toward native French, but it takes two to tango." --- Thanks! P.S. If the writer is not native, how "bad" is his/ her English?
    4 answers · 13 hours ago
  • Is it grammatically correct to refer to a person as “it”?

    For example, say I want to say: My spouse baked these cookies for me. It is a lot better at baking than I am. Is this grammatically correct? If not, how can I correct it?
    For example, say I want to say: My spouse baked these cookies for me. It is a lot better at baking than I am. Is this grammatically correct? If not, how can I correct it?
    16 answers · 2 days ago
  • Two good words for me ..?

    9 answers · 4 hours ago
  • Which word is correct?

    When the submarine surfaced, it emerged (on/in) the western side of the cape. Thanks!
    When the submarine surfaced, it emerged (on/in) the western side of the cape. Thanks!
    11 answers · 1 day ago
  • What does the slang "GINGER." mean?

    14 answers · 2 days ago
  • Shepard or Shepherd?

    Best answer: Shepherd is the correct spelling of the word Job name. But it throws lots of people for a loop! Shepard is the last-name spelling. ... Last names as we know them now originated in the Middle Ages from people's occupations, where they lived, their father's first name, or even their appearance or... show more
    Best answer: Shepherd is the correct spelling of the word Job name.
    But it throws lots of people for a loop!
    Shepard is the last-name spelling. ...

    Last names as we know them now originated in the Middle Ages from people's occupations, where they lived, their father's first name, or even their appearance or disposition. In the early years of the Middle Ages, most people in Europe lived in small farming villages.

    Like, Smith & Smyth.
    The Domesday Book was compiled on the orders of William the Conquerer to catalogue the ownership and value of land in the newly conquered territories of England. It was completed in 1086.
    In the 11th century, surnames were still in a state of flux and many people still did not have them so many took their jobs, or adapted their fathers' (smithson, jameson, etc.)
    9 answers · 21 hours ago
  • Is this reply correct ?

    Best answer: Some might say "am," but what she says is right. That's because what you said uses the imperative "be." You give her a command, which is something you're ordering to "do," e.g., "Do be happy." So it's right to say, "I do always." In fact, it... show more
    Best answer: Some might say "am," but what she says is right. That's because what you said uses the imperative "be." You give her a command, which is something you're ordering to "do," e.g., "Do be happy." So it's right to say, "I do always." In fact, it doesn't actually say the same thing as saying, "I am always." "I am always" simply suggests that happy is her general state, but "I do always" says that she actively makes herself happy always, which is what you told her to DO when you said, "Be happy."
    13 answers · 2 days ago
  • Is sentence "Ain't never feared avalanches" correct?

    Best answer: I don't speak "ain't" or double negatives, but some people do. I wouldn't put it down as "correct", at least not for general use. Some groups do speak exactly that way, though, in which case that is "correct" within that group. You would probably get some odd reactions... show more
    Best answer: I don't speak "ain't" or double negatives, but some people do. I wouldn't put it down as "correct", at least not for general use. Some groups do speak exactly that way, though, in which case that is "correct" within that group. You would probably get some odd reactions if saying it outside of those groups though.
    15 answers · 3 days ago
  • What does "vanilla experience" mean?

    Please explain it with regards to the results of a search engine; I read about Ask.com that it yelds "the same vanilla results" - what does that mean? Thank you.
    Please explain it with regards to the results of a search engine; I read about Ask.com that it yelds "the same vanilla results" - what does that mean? Thank you.
    7 answers · 13 hours ago
  • I was called little no peep - what does it mean?

    A motivational speaker visited my class today and said "I was like little no peep, kind of like yourself" as he was referring to me. I don't understand what he meant in this context?
    A motivational speaker visited my class today and said "I was like little no peep, kind of like yourself" as he was referring to me. I don't understand what he meant in this context?
    7 answers · 16 hours ago
  • What is the difference between peculiar (odd) and shallow?

    Best answer: Larry is peculiar because he likes to wear a cape to school. Larry is shallow because he only dates women who wear a D cup bra or bigger.
    Best answer: Larry is peculiar because he likes to wear a cape to school. Larry is shallow because he only dates women who wear a D cup bra or bigger.
    8 answers · 1 day ago
  • Israeli's and Russians use bots to troll the internet?

    Have you noticed recently the comments supporting trump since the elections seem all to be the same, copy paste. Sometimes they don't fit the article or make little sense. Also mostly fake accounts, bots. I have recently noticed the same with Israeli articles like here on yahoo, similar strategy, and also get... show more
    Have you noticed recently the comments supporting trump since the elections seem all to be the same, copy paste. Sometimes they don't fit the article or make little sense. Also mostly fake accounts, bots. I have recently noticed the same with Israeli articles like here on yahoo, similar strategy, and also get plenty of likes. The comments seem repetitive, with little or no sense. I am working on a project in Natural language processing in A.I, and I know that this is the case here. Any ideas?
    10 answers · 2 days ago
  • When someone says "she had no emphasis on what she was saying" what does it mean?

    When someone says "she had no emphasis on what she was saying" what does it mean?
    When someone says "she had no emphasis on what she was saying" what does it mean?
    6 answers · 6 hours ago
  • What does the word immediate mean?

    7 answers · 1 day ago
  • Why is the “N word” so offensive?

    Best answer: As you note, US culture and history has given the n-word the reputation of being a vile, offensive, derisive term for those who are black. Because racial bigotry continues to persist even after the abolition of slavery about 150 years ago, the connotation of the n-word continues to be negative and foul. As a... show more
    Best answer: As you note, US culture and history has given the n-word the reputation of being a vile, offensive, derisive term for those who are black. Because racial bigotry continues to persist even after the abolition of slavery about 150 years ago, the connotation of the n-word continues to be negative and foul. As a result, while some use it in different ways even within black communities, others retain the original foul meaning and those who do not want to offend or to be offensive generally avoid using it.
    6 answers · 10 hours ago
  • Is “run off some copies” used in the meaning of “make some photocopies”? Is “run off” here natural English?

    ☆ Sent from iOS Dr. Know! 1.1.03
    ☆ Sent from iOS Dr. Know! 1.1.03
    6 answers · 12 hours ago